POSTSECONDARY RESOURCE GUIDE

Programs Supporting Student Success

The nine largest institutions of higher education, including two HBCUs in the region offer programs designed to support different groups of students to achieve success at their institutions. Programs are listed by program type for The Citadel, Charleston Southern University, Claflin University, the College of Charleston, Clemson University, Medical University of South Carolina, Trident Technical College and the University of South Carolina. (South Carolina State University chose not to participate.)

Support for low-income students and students of color is such an integral part of the education provided by HBCUs that discrete programs at Claflin University are relatively few and are listed separately beneath the table.

Special thanks to Kenda Conley at the College of Charleston for her assistance in compiling this Guide.

Click here to download a printer-friendly version of the complete resource guide.

Program TypeInstitutionWho…?Is doing what…?For whom…?And why are they doing it?How is success measured?
Disabled StudentsThe CitadelAcademic Support CenterProviding services and support to respond to the academic needs of students with disabilities
Students with documented disabilitiesTo support students with documented disabilities
Increase retention
Student satisfaction surveys
Retention rates
Disabled StudentsClemsonStudent Disability Services
SDS coordinates the provision of reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. All reasonable accommodations are individualized, flexible and confidential based on the nature of the disability and the academic environmentStudents with identified disabilitiesIn compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Clemson recognizes a student with a disability as anyone who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity.To ensure that students use what they learn about themselves and their advocacy skills in all aspects of their lives.
Disabled StudentsClemsonClemson LIFE ProgramThe ClemsonLIFE Program offers a 2-year Basic Program that incorporates functional academics, independent living, employment, social/leisure skills, and health/wellness skills in a public university setting with the goal of producing self-sufficient young adults. Additionally, the ClemsonLIFE Program offers a 2-year Advanced Program for students that have demonstrated the ability to safely live independently, sustain employment, and socially integrate during the Basic Program. The Advanced Program progresses with an emphasis on workplace experience, community integration, and independent living with transitionally reduced supports.The ClemsonLIFE program at Clemson University is designed for students with intellectual disabilities who desire a postsecondary experience on a college campus.The mission of the ClemsonLIFE Program at Clemson University is to provide a coordinated course of study that includes career exploration and preparation along with self-awareness, discovery, and personal improvement through a framework of courses, job internships, and community participation.Students who successfully complete the Basic or Advanced program will receive a corresponding certificate of postsecondary education.
Disabled StudentsCollege of CharlestonREACH ProgramA 4-year, fully-inclusive certificate program for students with mild intellectual and/or developmental disabilitiesStudents enrolled in REACH programTo enable students with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities the opportunity to have a college experience so they can live independent, self-determined lives. Certificate of completion for students; program evaluation annually
Disabled StudentsCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningCreating barrier free support for all students: The CSL continues to partner with the Office of Disability Services to provide academic support to students who have documented disabilities through a case management model.
Additionally, an audit was done of the CSL space to ensure that we are creating welcoming environments to support barrier-free access.
Students with documented disabilitiesTo support diverse student populations in their academic endeavors and connect them with a vital resource at the College early in their college career.CSL and ODS are in constant contact with one another in order to facilitate a barrier-free learning environment.
Disabled StudentsMUSCDisabled Student Services and College-Specific ADA CoordinatorsProviding services and support to respond to the academic needs of students with disabilitiesAll students who self- report a disability defined by the ADATo provide support for students in need of accommodations
Student satisfaction regarding accommodations
Graduation and retention rates

Disabled StudentsUSCCarolinaLIFE4 year, inclusive program for students with intellectual disabilitiesStudents who are 18-22 years old who meet program criteriaProvides an opportunity for students with intellectual disabilities to interact with age appropriate peers and to have a college experience that provides opportunities for career and personal developmentProgram establishes exit goals with students and their parents that include goals for employment and independent living. Students who complete the program receive a certificate.
Disabled StudentsUSCStudent Disability Services
Karen Pettus, Director
Provides accommodations for students with disabilities in accordance with state and federal guidelinesStudents who are enrolled in the university or intend to enrollProvide accommodations for students and remain in compliance with federal lawStudent graduation rates, reach out to students who have below 2.0 semester GPA, Student satisfaction
VeteransThe CitadelThe Citadel Graduate CollegeOffice of Military and Veterans AffairsVeteran Students and Active Duty Military StudentsProvide support for the integration into college live
Increased retention
Retention rates
Survey data
VeteransClemsonNew Student and Family Programs -
Veterans Programs

(Jeff Brown, Director)
• Student Veteran Resource Center
• Green Zone Training
• Veteran Orientation
• Veteran Graduation Reception and Recognition
Veteran Students• Smooth integration into civilian/college life
• Increased Retention
• Increased graduation rate
• Increased awareness of veteran students’ needs on campus
• Retention rates
• Graduation rates
• Survey data
VeteransMUSCOffice of Enrollment Management - Veteran Education Services
Provide support for veterans applying to MUSC and assist in financial aid opportunities while attendingProspective and current veteran students
Provide support and monitor each US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) student’s enrollment and academic progressVeteran acceptance rates
Retention and graduation rates
VeteransTrident Technical CollegeVeterans Upward BoundProviding a free educational program that prepares eligible U. S. military veterans to improve their academic skills so they can transition to the college of their choice.U.S. veterans whose discharge status is anything but dishonorable and have served 180 days or moreTo get assistance with their academic skills, in preparation for their enrollment into a post -secondary institution. To further their interest in personal and career choices to help them succeedSuccess is measured by completion of classroom assignments/exams, taking the COMPASS exam as a post-test and entry to a post-secondary institution.
VeteransTrident Technical CollegeFA/VAPalmetto Warrior Connection (PWC) provides education services, housing services, employments services and mental health support.VeteransPWC mission is to empower the warrior and their family by utilizing collaboration, advocacy and education by promoting relentless quality care.125 TTC veterans are served.
VeteransUSCStudent Success Center
Eric Moschella, Director
Providing specific support and outreach to population
Outreach and breakout session during transfer orientations
Advising the Student Veterans Association (SVA)
Programs/events targeting the population
Green Zone training
Veteran Student Services Advisory Committee
Student VeteransSupport student veterans during their transition into and during their time at UofSC
Connect student veterans with campus resources and the Student Veteran Association
Positively impact retention and graduation
Persistence rates
Graduation rates
Number of student veterans that utilize SSC and other campus resources
Number of students, staff, and faculty who are Green Zone trained.
Students of ColorThe CitadelMulti-cultural Student ServicesProviding a variety of student support services for minority students
Variety of student clubs, including the African American Society and Hispanic Honor Society.
Minority studentsImprove retentionRetention and graduation rates
Students of ColorClemsonOffice of Chief Diversity Officer
-
Minority Student Success Initiative

(Website)
• Providing online resources to connect students to on-campus support services
• Delivering on-campus programs related to student success
Students of color• Improved academic and social experiences
• Graduation rates
• Graduation rates
Students of ColorMUSCCollege of Nursing Teen Health Leadership Program

(Please also see the Library section of this report)
Engaging students in community health issues through online research and the development and implementation of a health information outreach project60 rural high school students each year: 76% are African American and 13% are Hispanic. 84% of students are on free or reduced lunchTo promote health careers among minority studentsSince the program’s inception, all but one of the participants has gone on to college. Fifty-seven percent of these students were the first in their families to attend college. Thirty percent of the students chose a major in a health-related field. Half of the respondents planned to go on to graduate school.
Students of ColorMUSC












Office of Chief Diversity Officer











Providing events, activities and educational opportunities that foster an inclusive environment and embrace diversity
Programs include Training and Intercultural education through NCBI and Safe Zone Training, Black History Month Speaker Series, Earl B. Higgins Achievement Award in Diversity, MLK Consortium, Pipeline and Recruitment Activities
Strategic planning for entire university in all diversity related matters




All students





















Create an academic healthcare community where every member is respected and valued by leveraging differences in ways that allow people to understand and be understood, and work together productively to change what’s possible


Student Satisfaction Scores
Changes in Student Demographics
Retention and graduation rates














Students of ColorMUSCOffice of Chief Diversity OfficerNational Coalition Building Institute Training ProgramAll students receive NCBI training.To enhance understanding of diversity in all its forms and to appreciate the value-added of having diverse populations

Fostering an inclusive environment supports students of color and other underrepresented groups
Student satisfaction ratings of the program; student ratings of MUSC culture valuing diversity
Students of ColorMUSCStudent Programs and Student Diversity Affinity Groups
Advise and facilitate all student Affinity Organizations: Multicultural Student Advisory Board (MSAB), Alliance for Hispanic Health (AHH), Alliance for Equality (AE), International Student Association (ISA)
Provide support for over 60 university wide and college specific student organizations
Collaborate with Office of Chief Diversity Officer in Providing Events, Activities and educational opportunities that foster an inclusive environment and embrace diversity in the MUSC community such as American Indian Expo, Black History Month Speaker Series, and Women’s History Month Speaker Series
Primarily URM students, Hispanic students, LGBTQ students (NOTE: All affinity groups and services are open to all MUSC students)
Promote an inclusive environment that fosters intellectual excellence and the true integration of a diverse student body into all aspects of academic lifeStudent Satisfaction Scores
Changes in student demographics
Retention and graduation rates
Students of ColorMUSCOffice of Diversity for the College of Dental Medicine
Support programs for URM Dental Students.
Additional outreach programs are implemented to encourage URM college students to pursue a career in the field of dentistry. Examples include EE Just Symposium, Annual Dental Day, Campus Visits and Pre-Dental Academy
Current Dental students
Undergraduate college students
Retention and academic success of URM students in the College of Dental Medicine
Increase the number of underrepresented minority applicants and enrolled students
-Retention, graduation rates, and licensing boards pass rate
-Changes in Student Demographics
Students of ColorMUSCCollege of Health Professions College Diversity CommitteeSponsoring student essay writing contest on the Value of Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce
Hosting Health Advisors Day
Increasing scholarship opportunities for Students
Expanding recruitment activities among college students
Assessing cultural competency content in curricula
Administering cultural empathy survey to new students
Supporting the Summer Careers Academy for Minority Students interested in Health Professions
Partnering with MUSC student organizations to host student events promoting diversity and inclusion
Current Health Professions Students
Prospective Health Professions Students
Increase student diversity and ensure that all graduates are culturally competentRetention and graduation rates
Changes in student demographics
Students of ColorMUSCCollege of Medicine Diversity Programs and InitiativesTraining opportunities in cultural understanding and cultural competency
URM Visitor Externship Program for medical students
Faculty mentoring for board exam review and residency applications
Mentoring Ensures Medical School Success (MEMS) Program
Student Ambassadors (for 1st yr. COM URM Students)
Peer Mentoring Programs (for 2nd year COM URM Students)
Student National Medical Association (SNMA) [an affinity group for URM medical students] sponsored programs in health care education of the minority populations in Charleston, SC. Examples included student designed local health fairs, bone marrow drives, sickle cell testing, and a large number of other community service activities that build a sense of community and peer support among URM College of Medicine students
Current College of Medicine URM Students (with a primary focus on African American as they are the largest recognized minority in the state)Promote retention and academic success of URM students

Increase racial and ethnic diversity reflecting the general population of South Carolina

Promote racial/ethnic and gender diversity in student leadership positions within the College of Medicine

Promote cultural understanding and cultural competency

Expand and enhance opportunities within the College of Medicine at all levels for individuals from all backgrounds
Changes in student demographics to reflect current state demographics
Retention and graduation rates of URM students
Students of ColorMUSCCollege of NursingProviding Student organizations and leadership opportunities such as Multi-Cultural Student Nursing Association (MSNA), Men in Nursing, Student Nursing Association (SNA), and Student Government Association (SGA)Several student organizations focus on URM students, but are open to all students.Ensure high retention and graduation rates
Promote an environment of respect, teamwork and mutual understanding among students, faculty and staff
Assist in recruiting and retaining students from underrepresented groups
Support the leadership development of underrepresented groups within the College, University and profession of nursing
Provide a forum for the creation, promotion, and maintenance of activities, programs, and policies that further our understanding of individual and group diversity in all areas of the College of Nursing
Changes in student demographics,
Retention and graduation rates
Students of ColorMUSCMulticultural Student Advisory Board (MSAB) – Student Programs and Student DiversityMSAB provides opportunities for social activities and community outreach with an emphasis on serving underserved populations.
Holds monthly meetings to address campus environment topics and serves as support for URM students
Any student self-identifying as URMStrives to improve the recruitment and retention of minority studentsParticipation in student meeting and events
Retention and graduation rates
Students of ColorMUSCAlliance for Hispanic Health (AHH) – Student Programs and Student DiversityPromotes and sponsors opportunities for cultural competency for health professionals, including lectures, films, and Spanish classes
Participates in community health events that serve the Hispanic community
Promotes opportunities for volunteering with the Spanish-speaking community
Provides regular email communication about opportunities in the community and organization initiatives
Students self-identifying as being of Latino decent
All students faculty/staff interested in promoting health and wellness of Hispanic populations
Serves as a support group for Latino students and facilitates the exchange of information and ideas among MUSC students, faculty, and staff and community health care organizations to promote the health and well-being of the Hispanic community of CharlestonParticipation in student meeting and events
Retention and graduation rates
Students of ColorMUSCCollege of Graduate StudiesMultiple presentations/programs/website annually to create affiliations with Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other OrganizationsStudents from historically black colleges and universities and other organizationsTo present research, recruit students, and provide career development in the biomedical sciencesAddress more than 20 HBCUs
Applicants are asked How Heard of Program on MUSC application.
Students of ColorTrident Technical CollegeMentoringAfrican-American Male LeadershipAfrican-American male students at TTCTo develop leadership potential and to promote academic success and personal achievement among TTC's African American male studentsWitnessing retention and growth in academic and personal areas of student's life
Students of ColorTrident Technical CollegeMentoringMale Leadership ConferenceAny TTC male studentsTo promote leadership and academic success and personal achievement among TTC's African-American male studentsExposure to leaders and acquisition of skills and information necessary to be an effective leader
Students of ColorUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs-Multicultural Assistance Peer Program (MAPP)
Shay Malone, Director
• Incoming students (first year and transfer) are matched with upper-class mentor who can help them navigate their way through their first year at USC
• Mentors will provide assistance finding campus resources, offices and departments; Campus partners facilitate workshops.
• Mentors increase awareness of interaction with other social and cultural groups within the University campuses.
• Mentors will help develop personal, social, cultural, leadership, and professional skills.

For all first year and transfer students. This program is marketed to African-American, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American student population. (Approximately 20% of the campus population) • Positively affect student success, retention, and graduation rates
• Establish positive mentoring relationships and connection to the campus community.
• Increase knowledge of learning strategies and self-management behaviors
• Students learn how to be positive role models and leaders
• Enrollment persistence rates
• Graduation rates
• Student engagement/
participation rates
• Survey data regarding students’ behaviors, attitudes,
beliefs, and satisfaction as students
• Post-graduation rates
Students of ColorUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs-Men of Color Initiative
Shay Malone, Director
• The Men of Color Initiative is a program that provides support and encouragement to students that identify as men of color. Participants in the program connect with each other, as well as faculty, staff, and community mentors with the goal of positively influencing these students’ college experiences.
• Develop self-awareness, a sense of belonging, create academic confidence and engage in direct service to the community.

All male students first year through senior year. This program predominately targets African-American, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American males. (Approximately 20% percent of the campus population).• Positively affect student success, retention, and graduation rates
• Establish positive connection to the campus community.
• Develop personal, social, cultural, leadership, and professional skills.
• Enrollment persistence rates
• Graduation rates
• Student engagement/
participation rates
Students of ColorUSCUndergraduate Admissions – Multicultural Outreach Student Team (MOST)
Mary Wagner, Director
Engage current students in USC’s minority recruitment efforts.
Share experiences of campus life as a student of color on campus
Assist with recruitment activities including presentations, note writing campaigns, and tele-counseling.
Expand student leadership opportunities through peer training and mentoring.
Prospective students and applicants who identify with underrepresented races/ethnicities.RecruitmentReport on number of students attending events at which MOST presents, number of calls/letters sent, number of students applying/enrolling if they had contact with a MOST student.
Students of ColorUSCUndergraduate Admissions – High School Visits with MOST team
Mary Wagner, Director
Visit SC high schools with large minority student populations.
Engage MOST members in recruitment process by having them take their experience “home” to their high schools.
High schools with large minority populations.
High schools from which MOST students matriculated.
RecruitmentAnnual report of number of high schools visited, number of students contacted.
Students of ColorUSCUndergraduate Admissions- Summer Seniors
Mary Wagner, Director
Extended Summer recruitment program, residential in nature.
Provide college application process overview, career planning, and financial aid basics.
South Carolina’s top African American rising high school seniors.Build awareness of academic offerings at the state’s flagship university to recruit the state’s most outstanding African American students.
Annual report on number of students submitting applications for the program.
Track number of Summer Senior students who apply, are accepted, and enroll at USC.
Students of ColorUSCUndergraduate Admissions – Minority Preview
Mary Wagner, Director
Pre-Open House program
Engaging prospective students with current minority students, faculty, and administrators.
Provide overview of programming and services for minority students at USC.
Any minority student considering USC.Expand awareness of diversity programming and support on campus.
Recruitment
Annual report of number attending, applying, accepted, and enrolled.
Students of ColorUSCUndergraduate Admissions – Showcase
Mary Wagner, Director
Building social connections among admitted African American Students.
Highlighting student support services and engagement opportunities on campus.
Admitted African American ApplicantsDemonstrate supportive multicultural community on campus.
Connect students to resources prior to enrollment.
Familiarize students with campus through tours.
Recruitment
Annual report of number invites, attendees, and enrollees.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationThe CitadelOffice of Multicultural Student ServicesDiversity ProgrammingAll studentsIncrease retention of diverse populationsRetention
Diveristy Awareness and EducationClemsonMulticultural Center

(Altheia Richardson, Director)
• Advising/support of multicultural student organizations
• International Festival
• Ally Training
• Community Dialogues (party of CU-1000)
• GOODTalk
• MLK Celebration
Multicultural programming (i.e. #IAMCLEMSON, National Coming Out Week)
• Campus Climate Research
• International Students/Graduate Students
• All faculty/staff/students
• All first-year and transfer students
• Intercultural capacity building
• Exploration of identities and advocacy for self
• Gain heightened awareness of others that impacts overall campus climate
• Assessment of overall campus climate for diversity and inclusion
• Survey data regarding learning and experiences
• Campus climate survey data in comparison to previous years
Diveristy Awareness and EducationClemsonOffice of Chief Diversity Officer
-Gantt
• Advising/support of multicultural student organizations
• International festival
• Students of color
• LGBTQ Students
• Student Engagement• Engagement/participation
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonAcademic Advising and Planning CenterEducating advising staff to diversity related issues to foster advisor sensitivity to understanding students as a whole personAdvisorsContribute to the Campus climate for inclusionStudent feedback on advisory experience
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonCenter for Excellence in Peer EducationDiversity Training in TEDU 205 - Four sections of TEDU 205 is taught each year to students selected to serve in various peer education roles on the CofC campus. OID is invited to each class to speak about campus diversity initiatives and model activities for the peer educators to use with the students they will be serving.Future peer educators enrolled in TEDU 205To engage peer educators in critical dialogues and activities on diversity and social identities. This enables them to more effectively serve the students with whom they will work in their positions as peer educators.Classroom discussions and activities in TEDU 205. This course is offered 4 times per academic year.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonOrientationYour Voice and Your Views: Respecting Individual Differences: An interactive session with the orientation leaders about diversity and social identities in the college environment that includes time for questions and discussionsOrientation LeadersThe students will be able to describe the important of living and learning within a diverse campusThe program is evaluated through the online orientation survey completed by students at the end of the two day session
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningStudent employees receive diversity training as part of their CRLA tutor certification requirements and are encouraged to attend OID trainings to receive additional certification credit.Students employed in Center for Student LearningTo equip our student employees to work with diverse student populations helping all to achieve academic success.Per semester we compare the training our student employees have received with the list of CRLA Certification requirements
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonCenter for Excellence in Peer EducationDiversity Component in FYSS 101: FYE Peer Facilitators are required to include a diversity component in their FYSS 101 Synthesis Seminars. All first-year non-Honors students are required to enroll in and successfully complete FYSS 101.FYE Peer FacilitatorsTo engage first year students in critical dialogues and activities on diversity and social identities. These lesson plans are designed and implemented by Peer Facilitators with the help of CEPE and OID leadershipClassroom discussions and activities in FYSS 101. We offer enough sections to accommodate all first- year non-Honors students, approximately 100 sections each academic year.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningProfessional photos of students in the CSL are utilized in CSL marketing materials, showing the wide variety of students who use the CSL; an online video was created of CSL services to showcase the Center; and the CSL has a significant presence at all Admissions Office efforts including AALANA, Summer Project, etc.StudentsTo promote the Center's work with diverse populations.Each year as the marketing plan is assessed, how to reach more diverse student populations is considered
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonFirst Year Experience (FYE)A 2-hour workshop offered in conjunction with OID.FYE studentsTo bring diversity awareness to first-year students and to encourage first year minority students to take on leadership positions on campusPost Workshop Surveys
Diveristy Awareness and EducationCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningIntegral participation in SPECTRA, Gear Up, Upward Bound, REACH, ROAR and with community partners such as Beckham Scholars and Burke High School guidance counselors. : We provide several workshops for SPECTRA, ROAR, Gear Up, and Upward Bound students (by professional staff and peer tutors) and provide one-on-one tutoring sessions for SPECTRA students during their summer semester on campus. We have provided workshops and outreach to several community groups including young African American males from the Beckham Scholars Program at Wando High School and Burke High School guidance counselors.Diverse student populationsTo support diverse student populations in their academic endeavors and connect them with a vital resource at the College early in their college career.After each summer we review the SPECTRA survey results and debrief internally with the peer tutors to assess what is working and what isn't. We do a similar debrief for all our outreach workshop activities.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationMUSCOffice of Training and Intercultural EducationPlanning, developing, coordinating, implementing, managing and assessing intercultural education and training initiatives;
Serving as a University resource for students, faculty and staff; collaborating with student organizations and advisors in the planning and implementation of programs that enhance intercultural and interprofessional awareness, dialogue, and experiences.
All studentsTo create an inclusive and supportive environment for URM students and other underrepresented groups
To expose students, faculty, and staff at MUSC to opportunities for interprofessional and intercultural education skills development and training
Ensure an institutional culture of inclusion and create an atmosphere of commitment to interprofessional (IPE) practice, and value of intercultural education (IE)
Participation numbers
Student Satisfaction scores
Retention and graduation of URM students
Diveristy Awareness and EducationMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental MedicineJBECDM Office of Diversity focuses on the recruitment, retention, and matriculation of a diverse student population.Candidates, current students, and alumniThe Office of Diversity provides recruitment and retention services for the college and provides ongoing services and resources to students within the CollegeRetention and graduation rates of URM students
Program evaluations/ratings
Diveristy Awareness and EducationMUSCSHPURD Organization (Student Health Professions United Recognizing Diversity)Current College of Health Professions (CHP) student organization with a focus on diversity issues within our students, community, CHP, and MUSC.Open to any enrolled student in CHPTo promote diversity and inter-professionalism within our student bodyTo support our students with a knowledge that diversity is welcome and appreciated within CHP
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs- Cultural, Diversity, and Social Justice Programming
Shay Malone, Director
• Workshop opportunities in cultural understanding, cultural competency, and social justice education
• Programs and events that will increase cultural awareness and understanding around different identities
• Celebrate five cultural heritage months to increase awareness of various cultural identities
• Advise student organizations
All Students, faculty, and staff. Some programs are open to the community. • Establish positive connection to the campus community
• Increase knowledge, cultural awareness and understanding of other identities
Survey data regarding students’ behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs-Social Justice Activist Programs
Shay Malone, Director
• The Social Justice Activist Program (SJP) is a program designed to create a network of students who acknowledge and know how to combat bias and who want to become activist within their community.
• To provide evidence of the support of all people who have experienced bias and their allies within the community.
• Empowering students as leaders to become civically engaged in global community issues
• To engage in a learning environment with social justice and complete the full aspect of this new certificate program.
All Students• Promote the differences in racial/ethnic and gender identities
• Promote cultural understanding and cultural competency
• Increase understanding of various aspects of diversity.

Survey data regarding students’ behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs-Civil Rights Tour
Shay Malone, Director
• Civil Rights Alternative Spring Break Experience includes service-learning experiences at sites in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia.
• Offers a service component focusing on a wide variety of current civil and human rights issues that were important during the Civil Rights Movement. The participants will work within the various communities at different sites through direct and indirect service as well as advocacy work.
Open to all students• Students will understand the concepts of segregation and other inequities during the civil rights movement.
• To expose students to the cultural history of the south through interactive experiences outside of the classroom.
Survey data regarding attitudes and satisfaction.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCInternational Student Services – Carolina Intercultural Training Program
Jody Pritt, Director
Provides guidance to USC students, faculty, and staff on intercultural communication strategies for working with students of other cultures. USC Campus CommunityTo promote and support an international student friendly campus beyond the International Student Services office.Survey data and assessments of participants in the program and through the annual international student satisfaction survey.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCInternational Student Services - International Education Week
Jody Pritt, Director
A week to promote and celebrate international exchange and activity on campus.USC Campus CommunityTo promote the goals of Global Carolina and offer activities and experiences that promote and highlight internationalization on campusParticipant surveys and committee feedback
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCInternational Student Services – Thinking Globally Program
Jody Pritt, Director
Cultural presentations and round table discussions in University classrooms and in the K-12 communityUSC Campus CommunityTo promote intercultural enlightenmentClassroom student and instructor feedback after each presentation as well as international student participants’ feedback.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCInternational Student Services – Buddies Beyond Borders Program
Jody Pritt, Director
Assists with the social transition of international students but also gives American students the opportunity to befriend someone of another country/culture/language.USC Campus CommunityTo promote the building of international relationshipsParticipant surveys and anecdotal feedback.
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCOffice of Diversity and Inclusion
John Dozier, Chief Diversity Officer
SC Collaborative on Racial Reconciliation; Campus climate studies (beginning March 2016); Faculty workshops to facilitate effective conversations about social identitiesUSC Campus CommunityTo promote and support diversity and inclusionClimate study gains over time; participation in dialogues and workshops; student and faculty diversity
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCMaxcy Residential College - University Housing

Kirsten Kennedy, Director of University Housing
The International House at Maxcy College serves international and domestic students. In collaboration with the Maxcy faculty principal team, University housing implements a community education plan tailored to international exploration. Students that reside in Maxcy CollegeTo promote exposure to new cultures and internationalizationAn end of the year survey and learning community assessment
Diveristy Awareness and EducationUSCResident Mentor Diversity Training

Kirsten Kennedy, Director of University Housing
Resident Mentors receive diversity training from the Housing Diversity Committee multiple times per yearAll Resident MentorsTo promote and support diversity and inclusionSurveys of RM experiences
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsThe CitadelOffice of Admissions/ School of EngineeringNSF Scholarship ProgramMinority and female studentsIncrease diversity within the Corps CadetEnrollment demographics
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsClemsonEnrollment Management- Financial Aid Programs

(Jennifer Williams, Interim Director)
• Awarding scholarships that promote the diversity of the entering class, including first-generation students. Some of the scholarships include:
1. Gateway 2 Clemson scholarship
2. Charles Mickel Scholarship
3. Buck Mickel Scholarship
4. Harvey Gantt Scholarship
5. Susan and Harry Frampton Scholarship
6. Gantt Engineering Scholarship
• Awarding Clemson University Hardship and Completion grants to students with extenuating circumstances each year on a case-by-case basis.
• Maintaining and updating a financial literacy page with information about budgeting, saving, credit, etc. to educate our students (http://www.clemson.edu/financial-aid/financial-literacy/)
• Awarding one-time STEM scholarships to incoming freshmen in STEM majors who meet the requirements of the Palmetto Fellows Scholarship.
All qualifying undergraduate and graduate students• To assist in recruiting, attracting, and enrolling the best possible group of new students at the University
• To help students secure the funds necessary to pursue their educational goals at Clemson University
• Number of scholarships awarded to diverse students
• % of FAFSAs completed by diverse students by the deadline
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsMUSCCollege of Nursing Scholarship ProgramsProviding ScholarshipsURM college graduates without nursing degrees who are enrolled in accelerated baccalaureate and master's nursing programsTo increase diversity and to recruit and enroll minority students in MUSC College of Nursing1) Successful completion of the program
2) Successful completion of licensure and/or certification
3) Employment
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsMUSCThe College of Health Professions (CHP) Scholarship ProgramsKim Martino Scholarship: Provided two $2,500 scholarships annually.Martino: Incoming URM students in the College of Health ProfessionsTo promote URM involvement and access to health-related professional educationRetention and graduation rates of URM nursing students
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsMUSCThe College of Health Professions (CHP) Scholarship ProgramsKitty Lou Tilghman Scholarship – Providing Physician Assistant Studies diversity scholarship of $2,000 annually. Tilghman- Current URM PA StudentTo promote URM involvement and access to health-related professional educationRetention and graduation rates of URM nursing students
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsMUSCThe College of Health Professions (CHP) Scholarship ProgramsGraduate Incentive Scholarship- (Monies awarded through the MUSC Office of Student Diversity)For any URM enrolled in any program within CHPTo promote URM involvement and access to health-related professional educationRetention and graduation rates of URM nursing students
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsMUSCStudent Programs and Student Diversity – MUSC Education and Student LifeGraduate Incentive Scholarship (GIS) Awards
Emergency Student Loan and Scholarship Program
Student Leadership Development Stipend
Program Prep for Boards
URM students seeking graduate level degrees are eligible for GIS Awards
All students are eligible for other aid awards
Provide additional financial assistance to students based on need and/or meritParticipation numbers
Retention and graduation rates of recipients
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsMUSCEducation and Student Life Forgivable loansProviding $500K in aid funds since 2006Underrepresented minority students attending MUSCTo promote retention and academic successRetention and graduation rates
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsUSCGamecock GuaranteeSince 2008, the Gamecock Guarantee has offered an affordable, high quality education to academically talented first-generation students from low-income South Carolina families.  The scholarship covers tuition and technology fees for four years (as long as the student continues to meet the program criteria).Low income, first generation studentsTo provide low income, first generation students with high quality education
Scholarships for Diverse and Underrepresented StudentsUSCEnrollment Management Division – Carolina Community Award
Mary Wagner, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
Collaborating with 100 Black Men of Columbia to award scholarship to African American students from greater Columbia areaAdmitted African American students demonstration evidence of leadership and service to the community.Recognize achievement beyond the classroom.
Recruitment
Annual report of number of offers and number attending.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingThe CitadelNational Coalition Building Institute (NCBI)Educational training programsFaculty, staff, studentsIncrease retention of diverse populationsRetention
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingCharleston Southern UniversityBridge ProgramProvides remedial instruction on English and Math.For underprepared students. Many are first-generation and students from low income families.To help students succeed that would likely drop out of higher education.Primarily by cohorts, but data for particular groups can be isolated and analyzed
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingCharleston Southern UniversityWriting LabProvides one-on-one help to improve student writing, including E-tutoring.Any student who requires help and/or feedback to improve their writing skill.To support improvements to writing across campus.Primarily by review of student portfolios.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingCharleston Southern UniversityFinish LineThis software product allows CSU to provide needed intervention for students across functional areas.Primarily used to provide early intervention for students who enter CSU with descriptive factors that identify them as at risk for retention and degree completion.To involve the combined resources of faculty and staff to ensure at risk students are provided every opportunity to succeed at CSU.Retention of at risk students.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingCharleston Southern UniversityMath LabProvides one-on-one tutoring for students.Students enrolled in Math 099, 105, 111, 130.To improve persistence through follow-on math courses.Persistence rates.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingCharleston Southern UniversityLearning CenterProvides academic and writing support services across the curriculum.This free tutoring service is available to all students.To support academic success for any students seeking help.Grade improvements for those who frequent the center.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingClemsonUndergraduate Studies-
Academic Success Center

(Sue Whorton, Director)
• Tutoring
(Offered for 100+ courses and 50%+ are STEM courses.)
• Supplemental Instruction
(Offered for courses with DFW rates higher than the average. 90%+ courses supported are STEM courses.)
• Academic Coaching
• Academic Strategy Workshops
• Academic Counseling
• Cross-College Advising
• CU 1000 (Clemson Connect – 0 credits)
• Academic Recovery Program
• CU 1010
(University Success Skills course - 2 credits)


• All undergraduate students
• The Academic Recovery Program and CU 1000 are targeted to students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0
• Positively impact student success indicators (persistence, scholarship retention, DFW and graduation rates)
• Increased academic self-efficacy
• Increased commitment to academic achievement
• Increased knowledge of learning strategies
• Increased adoption of self-management behaviors
• Acquisition of transferrable skills
• Enrollment persistence rates
• Scholarship retention rates
• Graduation rates
• DFW rates
• Student engagement/
utilization rates
• Student self-reports (survey data) of increase in academic self-efficacy, knowledge of learning strategies, adoption of self-management behaviors, and commitment to academic achievement
• Student satisfaction levels
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingClemsonOffice of New Student and Family Programs
-
Underrepresented Student Programs
(Jeff Brown, Director)
• CONNECTIONS
• CONNECTIONS LLC
• Brother-to-Brother
• Dignity Fellows* (development)
• EDGE
Underrepresented students• Assist with college transition
• Build/establish mentor/mentee relationships
• Role-modeling
• Provide academic support
• Increase retention and graduation rate
• Increase participation in high-impact student engagement activities- internships, study abroad, etc.
• Promote inclusion and equity
• Retention rates
• Graduation rates
• GPA data
• Survey data
• Participation rate in high-impact student engagement activities- internships, study abroad, etc.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningAssessment of minority student usage of the CSL: Student usage of the CSL is compared demographically to the student body as a whole in order to determine whether we are serving all populations well. Additionally, minority student success is tracked according to whether they used CSL services or not.Students who use Center for Student LearningTo assess whether we adequately serve minority student populations.Annually OIR produces a report for the CSL on the demographic breakdown of our student users and the GPA and retention rates of users and non-users of the CSL
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCenter for Academic ExcellenceAll students: We assess whether URM students are accessing the services at proportional rates.Seminars and one-on-one instruction in test-taking skills, study skills, board exam preparation, time management, etc
Diagnostic exams for board preparation
To ensure retention and academic successRetention and graduation rates
Board exam pass rates
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Medicine Mentoring Ensures Medical School SuccessProviding COM URM students with mentors who will assist students to excel academically, emotionally, socially and professionallyAll URM COM studentsTo ensure retention, academic, social, and professional successSuccess measures:
# of students who participate

# of students who graduated
Approximately 110 students participate each year.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Medicine (COM) Summer Medicine AcademyTo increase the retention and graduation rates of underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students by increasing the participants' knowledge in health careersURM Undergraduate studentsThe Academy is a one-week summer program designed to help underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students prepare for entry into nursing, dental medicine, pharmacy, physician assistant, and occupational therapy training.15 students participate each year.

Success measures:
# of undergraduate students that went into health professions/medical school

7 students total were enrolled in COM.

5 students currently enrolled in COM.

1 student graduated from COM.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCSupplemental Instruction ProgramCourse-specific small group peer tutoringAll studentsEnsure retention and academic successRetention and graduation rates
Board exam pass rates
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCWriting CenterSeminars and one-on-one instruction in writing skillsAll students; we monitor whether URM students are accessing the service at a proportionate rateEnsure retention and academic successRetention and graduation rates
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Graduate StudiesInitiative for Maximizing Student DevelopmentUnderrepresented PhD students during their first and second yearsRetain and ensure the success of underrepresented groups in the biomedical sciencesSuccessful completion of dissertation research and awarding a PhD rose to 80%.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Health Professions (CHP) Research LabProviding a 10-week summer research programMinority graduate and undergraduate students enrolled in HBCUsTo expose 1-3 students annually to rehabilitation research through didactic courses and participation in team activitiesCompletion of an individual research project
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Medicine Cardiology Research Education ProgramProviding a Cardiology Research Education ProgramMinority medical school studentsTo provide short-term 10-12 week research training experiences and to acquaint them with biomedical research in cardiovascular pulmonary, and hematological diseases to increase pipeline of URM into the field10 fellowships per year are funded.
Success measures:
# of co-authored presentations

# of medical students pursuing a field in cardiology
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Medicine Department of OphthalmologyProviding the opportunity for URM medical students to attend the Student National Medical Association conferenceURM medical students who are members of the Student National Medical AssociationRetain and enhance recruitment of URM students into programs in Ophthalmology # of URM medical students entering ophthalmology residency programs
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Medicine (COM) and Education and Student Life (Center for Academic Excellence)Providing a six-week MCAT preparation course; take courses at MUSC through the Center for Academic ExcellenceURM undergraduate students and students from underserved areas of SCTo help increases MCAT scores and provide professional development for aspiring medical school applicants and thereby increase the number of URM and disadvantaged students at MUSCApproximately 10-15 undergraduate students participate each year

Increase in pre- and post-practice MCAT scores

Increase of MCAT scores from pre- to post-program

# students who complete the program

# of students who matriculate into medical school

76 students total were enrolled in SI program

48 students matriculated to COM.

9 students currently enrolled in SI.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingMUSCCollege of Medicine Resident Ambassadors ProgramURM medical residents serve as mentors for URM medical studentsURM in medicine residents and URM medical studentsTo answer questions of potential resident applicants and to share their experiences at MUSC to recruit URM residents to MUSCApproximately 75 individuals participate annually

# of URM residents who serve as resident ambassadors

# of URM residents accepted per year

The percentage of URM residents increased from 9% to 13% in 2015
10 fellowships per year are funded.

Success measure:
# of co-authored presentations

Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingTrident Technical CollegeDOL Grant, Networking and CAD facultyProviding trained student coaches in computer labs as well as assisting instructors in the classroom with specific networking coursesVeterans, displaced workers, and students over the age of 25As a part of the DOL grant proposal TTC was one of 2 schools within the consortium to impart student coaches, money was budgeted to assist students in the Network Systems Management program with their courses and/or labs as they become more challenging through their course progression (specifically Linux and Cisco).Primarily, through direct feedback from the coaches with regard to the students grades and performance as well as surveys that are administered by the coaches at the end of the term. The SC ACCELERATE staff meets regularly with the coaches to troubleshoot and discuss student success and/or areas of need. Additionally, participants of the grant are tracked throughout their curriculum/career path for progress and completion.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingTrident Technical CollegeMentoringMale Mentoring ProgramAny male TTC studentsTo help males transition to college life and maintain a successful attitude in the college environmentProgression in chosen field of study by student semester by semester
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingTrident Technical CollegeFA/VAWorkforce Investment Act (WIA) provides individuals with access to training that helps them prepare for work.Unemployed/underemployed workersWIA helps businesses meet their need for skilled workers and provides individuals with access to training that helps them prepare for work.Individuals successfully complete training and are employed.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCGamecock Gateway – Admissions/Student Success Center – in collaboration Midlands Technical College
Mary Wagner, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
Eric Moschella, Director of the Student Success Center
One-year residential bridge program to enhance access to the university.Eligible students in need of additional academic and social support prior to enrolling at USCExpand opportunities for underprepared students to attend USC.
Annual report of cohort performance which includes number of invitees, acceptances, and ultimate USC matriculation the following year.
Average transfer hours, average GPA, retention/graduation rates after transfer to USC.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCStatewide Bridge Program – Admissions/Enrollment management in collaboration with all 16 SC Technical Colleges
Mary Wagner, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
Engaging prospective students in enhanced advising support prior to transitioning from a state technical college to USC.Eligible students in need of additional admissions and academic support prior to enrolling at USC.
Population includes high percentage of historically underprepared and/or minority students.
Provide expanded advisement on transfer admission requirements
Communicate transfer admission requirements for each major to provide more upfront assurances of what’s needed to join the USC community.
Annual report of number of students invited to Bridge, number accepting, number transferring.
Average transfer GPA and retention/graduation rates after transfer.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCOutreach to freshmen LIFE recipients in danger of losing the award
Joey Derrick, Director of Financial Aid and Scholarships
Reaching out to entering freshmen LIFE scholarship recipients who, based upon fall academic performance, appear to be in danger of losing the award.Freshman LIFE RecipientsOnce lost, the LIFE scholarship is difficult to re-attain. This results in an increased need for borrowing and possibly failure to earn a degree.Number of students reached, freshman to sophomore LIFE retention rates.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCOffice of Pre-Professional Advising
Eileen Korpita, Director
Association of Minority Pre-health StudentsUSC StudentsTo prepare and support minority students for healthcare careers as well as their collegiate academics by means of a family environmentNumber of students attending the meetings and events
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCCareer Center –IAP
Tom Halasz, Director
Career Accelerator ProgramInternational Students enrolled in Shorelight/IAPHelp IAP students obtain internship opportunitiesPercent of students who obtain Internships; learning outcomes
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCCareer Center – EXPLORE
Tom Halasz, Director
Exploring majors and careers with First Year StudentsFirst Year StudentsTo help students make informed decisions about majors and careersLearning outcomes related to making major/career decisions
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCStudent Success Center – Academic Skill and Decision Making Workshops
Eric Moschella, Director
During small group workshops, students discuss differences between high school and college, study strategies and effective academic habits for success in college.

Students evaluate their own learning and decision making habits, explore effective strategies, and create an academic action plan.
Low income and first generation students.
Educational support/mentoring/training
STEM Programs
First-Year Students
Students will develop effective study habits and learning strategiesNumber of workshops provided by type and location
Number of students attending workshops
Workshop survey results and check for understanding
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCStudent Success Center Peer Writing Program

Eric Moschella, Director
Seeks to strengthen college-level writing in a variety of academic disciplines
Undergraduate students in all majorsImprove student success in specific courses through proactive student behavior leading to improved retention and graduation.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCStudent Success Center Out to Lunch Program

Eric Moschella, Director
Promotes faculty and undergraduate student interaction outside the classroom
Undergraduate students in all majorsImprove student success in specific courses through proactive student behavior leading to improved retention and graduation.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCGamecock Gateway – Admissions/Student Success Center – in collaboration Midlands Technical College
Mary Wagner, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
Eric Moschella, Director of the Student Success Center
One-year residential bridge program to enhance access to the university.Eligible students in need of additional academic and social support prior to enrolling at USCExpand opportunities for underprepared students to attend USC.
Annual report of cohort performance which includes number of invitees, acceptances, and ultimate USC matriculation the following year.
Average transfer hours, average GPA, retention/graduation rates after transfer to USC.
Educational Support/ Mentoring/ TrainingUSCStatewide Bridge Program – Admissions/Enrollment management in collaboration with all 16 SC Technical Colleges
Mary Wagner, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
Engaging prospective students in enhanced advising support prior to transitioning from a state technical college to USC.Eligible students in need of additional admissions and academic support prior to enrolling at USC.
Population includes high percentage of historically underprepared and/or minority students.
Provide expanded advisement on transfer admission requirements
Communicate transfer admission requirements for each major to provide more upfront assurances of what’s needed to join the USC community.
Annual report of number of students invited to Bridge, number accepting, number transferring.
Average transfer GPA and retention/graduation rates after transfer.
STEM ProgramsThe CitadelSTEM Center of ExcellenceThe STEM Center delivers outreach initiatives to increase P-20 student interest, participation and opportunities in the STEM disciplines and develops innovative programming related to teacher preparation.P-20 students, faculty, staff, and community educatorsPromote an interest and understanding of STEM fields to ensure students are prepared to succeedAnnual assessment report including surveys, learning outcome assessment, and focus groups.
STEM ProgramsThe CitadelSchool of EngineeringSTEM Supplemental InstructionSTEM MajorsIncrease retention and graduation ratesRetention rates
Graduation rates
STEM ProgramsThe CitadelWomen in Engineering ProgramStudent Support Club and programmingFemale Engineering studentsIncrease retention of diverse populationsRetention
STEM ProgramsClemsonCollege of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences -WAVS Program

(Kathy Still, Coordinator)
• Requires each WAVS student to attend tutoring once per week in any of the following courses: AVS 1500, BIO 1030, CH 1010, MATH 1010 or MATH 1020; 100% are STEM courses @ the academic success center
• Each student is assigned a mentor who was a previous WAVS, to help foster and orient them to college life at Clemson.
• WAVS are provided an etiquette dinner and professional dress seminar to promote career success.
• AVS curriculum includes the course, AVS 4000, which further enhances professional development. Instructor is an AVS advisor.
• Freshman-year women in Animal and Veterinary Sciences
(Freshman-year LLC only)

• Upper-class women students volunteer as “lifeguard” mentors to new WAVS members.
• Provide an opportunity to have a sense of “belonging” and an easy transition into their first year of college
• Cultivate self-exploration, gaining personal awareness and development of the individual in academic and social areas.
• Increase intellectual engagement skills and finding value in becoming a lifelong learner
• Positively impact global citizenship; Increase in student’s awareness of issues impacting the community and the world, as well as the capacity and desire to take action to make positive, sustainable change.
• Community living stimulates individuals working together, creating standards and holding each other accountable. Students in WAVS encourage each other to study, attend class, etc. due to them taking similar classes
• Housing conducts a GPA /LLC assessment
• AVS has a formal assessment committee that tracks AVS students from freshman to senior year through a beginning and ending survey
• Enrollment persistence rates tracked by freshman advisor
STEM ProgramsClemsonCollege of Engineering and Science-
Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Program

(Serita Acker, Director)
• Tutoring
• Academic and Personal Counseling
• Proactive Mentoring
• Professional Development
• Social and Transitional Programs
• Recruitment
• Outreach
• Living and Learning Community
Women in CES majors• Increased academic self-efficacy
• Increased commitment to academic achievement
• Increased knowledge of STEM opportunities in STEM
• Increased adoption of self-management behaviors
• Acquisition of transferrable skills
• Positively impact student success and graduation rates
• Enrollment persistence rates
• Scholarship retention rates
• Graduation rates
• DFW rates
• Student engagement/participation rates
• Scholarship retention rates
• Survey data regarding students' behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction
STEM ProgramsClemsonCollege of Engineering and Science- PEER Program

(Serita Acker, Director)
• Tutoring
• Academic and Personal Counseling
• Proactive Mentoring
• Professional Development
• Social and Transitional Programs
• Recruitment
• Outreach
• Summer bridge
• Alumni Services
Underrepresented students in CES majors• Increased academic self-efficacy
• Increased commitment to academic achievement
• Increased knowledge of opportunities in STEM
• Increased adoption of self-management behaviors
• Acquisition of transferrable skills
• Positively impact student success and graduation rates
• Enrollment persistence rates
• Scholarship retention rates
• Graduation rates
• DFW rates
• Student engagement/participation rates
• Scholarship retention rates
• Survey data regarding students' behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction
STEM ProgramsCollege of CharlestonFYE HHMI SEA Phase ProgramA unique research-based BIOL 111 lab course for SCAMP students that is funded by HHMI. In the spring it runs as a FYE Research CourseStudentsTo increase minority/first generation student performance and retention in STEM fields and encourage them to pursue research.2014 CURE Assessment Tool; Longitudinal Tracking of Students entering Research Labs
STEM ProgramsCollege of CharlestonFYE-SCAMPA learning community that initially combined MATH 120 and CHEM 111 for SCAMP students. It now combines MATH 120 and BIOL 111.FYE studentsTo increase minority/first generation student performance and retention in STEMHHMI Assessment since 2009 - CURE Assessment Tool, GPA and Retention through 4th Semester of Chemistry
STEM ProgramsMUSCMUSC Library- Pipeline Development ProgramAffording students exposure to STEM careersHigh Schools and middle schools in rural areasTo encourage students to focus on the areas of math, science, engineering, technology, and medicineOver 1,000 students have participated since 2012-2013
STEM ProgramsMUSCSC Area Health and Education Consortium (AHEC) Health Careers AcademyProviding communication, math, and science skills to be a health care professional through monthly meetings, field trips, health fairs, and speaker events. Also providing academic advisement related to health care careers.State-wide high school studentsTo promote interest in STEM careers including those related to health care381 high school students attend annually.

Among high school students who have participated in the SC AHEC health career programs for 110 or more hours since 2005 (Achievers), we have collected data to allow us to more effectively track their academic progress using the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) Student Tracker. We have begun evaluating outcomes for 346 trackable students who have had sufficient time to 1) graduate from high school, 2) enter college and/or 3) graduate from college with a health major. An average of 86% of Achievers with anticipated high school graduation dates between 2005 and 2014 were successful in entering post-high school education (2 or 4 year college). Thus far, 73% of those (74 of 99) who entered college between 2005 and 2009 have graduated, approximately half with a health major.
STEM ProgramsMUSCEducation and Student Life and the College of Graduate Programs- MUSC Gives BackPresentations to increase awareness and excitement surrounding scientific researchMUSC graduate students and CCSD middle school studentsTo introduce students to various applied sciences studied at MUSC and to provide MUSC graduate students opportunities to share their knowledge of science and passion for research with the communityNumber of local students applying to the MUSC Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) and to colleges and universities majoring in biomedical sciences
STEM ProgramsTrident Technical CollegeUpward Bound Math & Science (TRIO program)UBMS encourages its participants to complete secondary school and enroll in postsecondary educational programs in STEM related fields. Our program helps students acquire skills and knowledge that increase the likelihood that they will enter a college or university and successfully complete an undergraduate program of study.Low-income, potential first generation college attendees who are rising 9th– 12th graders in three upper Berkeley county high schools: (1) Berkeley, (2) Cross, and (3) Timberland. To increase the number of 4-year college graduates from the served demographic, as well as provide comprehensive college/career access information and opportunities.Success is measured by a set of objectives mandated by the U.S. Department of Education and the Annual Performance Report (APR) submitted to the Department of Education at the end of each grant year.
STEM ProgramsUSCStudent Success Center Pre-calculus Review Program
Student Success Center Supplemental Instruction Program

Eric Moschella, Director
Reviews fundamental concepts and introduces strategies critical to academic success in calculus and other first-year courses
Provides peer-facilitated appointments and study sessions for gateway first-year courses led by qualified and trained undergraduate student Peer Leaders
Undergraduate students enrolled in courses from the STEM disciplinesIncreased demonstration of key concepts by students through problem-solving and examples, and increased application of study skills gained from appointments/sessions
Increased ability to integrate key concepts from most recent lectures with concepts learning in previous lectures
Placement test scores
Enrollment persistence rates
Enrollment grade comparisons between participants and non-participants
Graduation rates
Participant survey data regarding students’ behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction
STEM ProgramsUSCWomen in Science Living and Learning Community

Kirsten Kennedy, Director of University Housing
Women in Science is a living and learning community designed to serve women who are interested in the field of science. In collaboration with faculty members from the College of Arts and Sciences, University Housing implements a community education plan to foster post-graduation participation in a science-related profession.Students who elect to participate in the Women in Science learning communityProvide students with increased exposure to new ideas of the sciences and to offer a variety of out of classroom experiencesEnd of the year survey and learning community assessment
STEM ProgramsUSCCareer Center
Tom Halasz, Director
STEM Power conference to promote diversity in STEM fieldsUndergraduate women, underrepresented minorities, international studentsIncrease the number of women and minorities in STEM fieldsLearning outcomes
LGBTQ StudentsThe CitadelAssistant Provost for Diversity InitiativesSafe Zone Training to create and maintain a safe and inclusive campus environment for all studentsStudents, Faculty, and StaffIncrease campus awareness and understanding of issues faced by the LGBTQ community.
Social Climate surveys
LGBTQ StudentsThe CitadelMulticultural Student ServicesGay Straight AllianceMembers of the Corps of CadetsFoster a welcoming and supportive campus environment for all studentsSurveys
LGBTQ StudentsCollege of CharlestonOrientationOrientation Intern Training – Safe Zone Training for all interns to become Safe Zone Allies SafeZone Allies committed to creating and maintaining a safe and inclusive campus environment for all students regardless of their gender identity, expression or sexual orientation. SafeZone Allies help increase the campus community’s understanding and awareness of issues faced by LGBTQ persons through education and advocacy.Orientation LeadersSafeZone Allies help increase the campus community's understanding and awareness of issues faced by LGBTQ persons through education and advocacy.The yearly end of internship training survey
LGBTQ StudentsMUSCAlliance for Equality – Student Programs and DiversityAffinity support group for students identifying as LGBTQQAI and their allies
Holds monthly member meetings and events to promote awareness (Coffee Talk) and annual member events (2nd Chance Prom)
LGBTQQAI students and their alliesSupport LGBTQQAI students
Help increase the campus community’s understanding and awareness of issues faced by LGBTQQAI persons and provide a venue for support
Participation in meetings and sponsored events

Student satisfaction ratings/feedback
LGBTQ StudentsMUSCMUSC Safe Zone Program – Office of Training and Intercultural ProgramsProvide training opportunities for MUSC community about issues related to the LGBTQQAI community
Promoting a campus environment which cultivates a sense of belonging for LGBTQ students and other
Respecting individual differences of all constituents
Challenging campus community members to enhance decision-making skills, be independent learners and take responsibility for choices and actions
Empowering students as leaders to become civically engaged in global community issues
Creating opportunities for academic success through co-curricular experiences and community outreach
Collaborating strategically with the campus community and beyond, so that students benefit from a seamless experience
Advocating for the equal treatment of everyone
All students, faculty/staffTo increase sensitivity toward, knowledge of, and support for marginalized populations and issues that affect themParticipation in trainings and sponsored events
Students’ ratings of whether the MUSC culture values diversity
LGBTQ StudentsUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs-Safe Zone
Shay Malone, Director
Provides a foundation of knowledge needed to be an effective ally to LGBTQ students and an advocate for equal treatment of everyone.
All Students, faculty, and staffCultivate an understanding of differences in sexual and gender identities Cultivate a community of allies for the LGBTQ communitySurvey data regarding attitudes and satisfaction.
LGBTQ StudentsUSCOffice of Multicultural Student Affairs- LGBT Discussion Groups
Shay Malone, Director
LGBTQ Discussion Groups are small caucus-type groups that meet every other week through the semester. Facilitated by LGBT Peer Advocates to provide a safe, semi-structured space for folks to discuss different aspects of identity and issues that relate to their identities and communities.
For all students. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, or Queer students utilize discussion groups as for supportive spaces and a sense of communityProvide a safe space and sense of community for all LGBTQ students.
Identify challenges and concerns or LGBTQ community within the USC community.
Survey data regarding students’ behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction.
International StudentsThe CitadelInternational Student ServicesProviding student services to international students and hosting an International Student ClubAll international StudentsIncrease retention and aid in the transition processUsage and retention rates
International StudentsCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningELI "Speaking Lab" tutoring: ELI students wanted a place for conversation practice, with many of them trying to pass the speaking part of the TOEFL. Our Speaking Lab and other tutors have stepped forward to participate in this new initiative.International StudentsTo equip international students in the ELI program with better conversational English skills and a professional and caring atmosphere to practice their conversational English.Assess usage during semester and circle back to ELI program participants
International StudentsCollege of CharlestonCenter for Student LearningForeign Language Lab Hiring Practices & Marketing of Study Abroad: The CSL Foreign Language Lab hires many international students to serve as language tutors for the 13 foreign languages covered by the lab and is a huge marketer of the College's study abroad programs.International students in ELI programTo equip international students in the ELI program with better conversational English skills and a professional and caring atmosphere to practice their conversational English.Anecdotally students enjoy being tutored by someone whose native tongue is the language they are learning and we are known on campus as a resource for study abroad literature.
International StudentsMUSCCenter for Global HealthCultural programming such as International Bazaar and World Cultural Fair
Immigration services, orientations and tax seminars
Ispeak and ESL networking opportunities (internal and community-based)
-Issuing of Travel grants to developing countries and travel insurance
Health and Safety Education and Compliance for international travel
All students, faculty and staff with an emphasis on International students To ensure International students have a supporting, rewarding and productive educational experience at MUSC.
To further understand cultural and societal differences, and ultimately improve the health of those not only in the United States, but also around the world
Participation in programming and activities
Student satisfaction
International StudentsMUSCInternational Student AssociationPlan and promote opportunities for cultural exchanges between International and American students through programs that enhance campus-wide understanding of people's differences and similarities
Expose Internationals to American culture and enable them to make a smooth transition into the educational and work environment at the Medical University of South Carolina
Expose Americans to international cultures from around the world through cultural programming
International students and the general study bodyTo welcome and assist new International students as they arrive on campus
To assure International students have a rewarding, supportive and productive educational experience at MUSC
Participation in student events and activities
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Cultural and adjustment support services for new international students
International studentsTo ensure a welcoming atmosphere on campus and a smooth transition to the USC student experienceAssessment of new international student experience employed annually
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Orientation programming for new international studentsInternational studentsTo ensure students have the resources and information needed to begin studies successfullyAssessment of new international student experience employed annually
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Cultural support services for current/graduating international studentsInternational studentsTo support the cultural development of international students attending USCAssessment of new international student experience employed annually
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Immigration advising and support for new/current/graduating international studentsInternational studentsEnsure compliance of international regulations for international students as well as compliance for the UniversityAssessment of new international student experience employed annually
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Community engagement services for new/current/graduating international studentsInternational studentsTo offer opportunities to engage with the Columbia and surrounding communities for international studentsAssessment of new international student experience employed annually
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Campus programming for international studentsInternational studentsTo provide opportunities for international students to engage with their American counterparts as well as other international students to highlight international activity and experience on campusAssessment of new international student experience employed annually
International StudentsUSCInternational Student Services
Jody Pritt, Director
Tax reporting assistance for current international studentsInternational studentsTo ensure tax compliance for international students at the UniversityA review of software used to assist students is employed after each tax reporting season.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsThe CitadelOffice of Admissions• PAWS (Preparing and Assisting the Whole Student) Program
Discover The Citadel
Minority and female applicants
Increase diversity within the Corps Cadet
Enrollment demographics
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsClemsonEnrollment Management -
Undergraduate Admission Programs

(Robert Barkley, Director)
• Representing the University at college fairs and various outreach programs.
• Counseling and advising prospective students who visit the campus and contact the University through electronic/traditional means.
• Processing and reviewing applications for admission
• Offering admission to the desired number of qualified applicants
• Providing various recruitment/outreach efforts to help encourage the accepted students to attend Clemson University
• Providing post-acceptance services and advisement (especially regarding academic major) for students prior to enrollment.
All prospective students interested in undergraduate education at Clemson University• To help recruit, attract, and enroll the best possible group of new students at the University, taking into consideration a number of factors and variables (which at times may be in conflict with each other).• The total number of new undergraduate students.
• The in-state/out-of-state residency mix of these students
• The standardized test scores of these students (SAT and ACT)
• The high school performance of these students, most notably the percentage in the top ten percent of the high school class.
• The racial/ethnic diversity of these students
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCMUSC Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan- URM Recruitment and Pipeline DevelopmentProviding recruitment tools and support resources including scholarships, mentoring programs, internships, etc.Build relationships with feeder high school/universities to educate students about health care careersTo recruit URM students to MUSC
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCHP Anesthesia for Nurses ProgramSupporting a national Diversity in Nurse Anesthesia program through AFN faculty and student participation in potential applicant panels. Dr. Angela Mund, CRNA was invited to serve on the March 2015 faculty panel at UT-Chattanooga, and Ms. Teletha Ruth, SRNA served on the student panel during the same workshop. The potential exists to hose the Diversity Workshop at MUSC in the future.

http://diversitycrna.org/mission.php
URM nurses who have not had exposure to the possibilities of a career in nurse anesthesia or who need mentorship in submitting a successful application and in preparing for the academic rigor when admitted to a program. The Diversity in Nurse Anesthesia Mentorship Program brings nurse anesthesia programs and potential students together in one gathering.There is an overall lack of diversity in the Nurse Anesthesia Profession and low numbers of URM nurses apply to nurse anesthesia programs. The Diversity in Nurse Anesthesia Mentorship has been successful in assisting URM nurses learn about nurse anesthesia and assist in preparing for the admissions process.# of URM nurses who enter Nurse Anesthesia Program.
The program has admitted at least two URM students who attended the Diversity Workshop. The AFN program has begun tracking which applicants have attended the Mentorship program prior to matriculation.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Health Professions Student Life & Recruitment Office and CHP Student Ambassador ProgramCampus tours, presentations on all CHP programs, and Student Ambassador Question & Answer panels
(This includes Adobe Connect live presentations to Minority Pre-Health Association.)
(As well, CHP participated occasionally with College of Medicine on their A Glimpse into Medicine days.)
Colleges and high schools with a diverse population:
Colleges include: Claflin University, South Carolina State University, Central Carolina Technical School, Georgia State University
High schools include: Lower Richland High School, Greenwood County high schools, College of Charleston Senior Project, Orangeburg Charter School of Health Professions, Columbia High School, Trident Tech Upward Bound, Orangeburg Consolidated School District, Garrett Academy of Technology, Orangeburg County Upward Bound, James Island Charter High School, Academy Magnet
To expose URM students to healthcare professions and inform them about the criteria that prepare them to enter and succeed in a CHP programIn the 2014-2015 academic year, more than 325 URM college and high school students visited CHP
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine- McClennan-Banks Residents and Fellows GroupProviding the McClennan-Banks Resident Society to retain and promote residents'/fellows' success
Activities include: educational seminars/workshops; networking/social activities
URM in medicine residents and fellowsTo enhance diversity in the College of Medicine and connect with the Greater Charleston community through service; provide networking with community physicians; mentor URM undergraduate College of Medicine studentsApproximately 62 residents participate per year.
Success measures:
# of resident participants

# of networking, educational and outreach opportunities per year

# of URM residents completing residency

100% participation rate
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental MedicineMUSC Dean’s Diversity Council Annual Meeting includes the request for assistance and strategies from alumni to enhance recruitment, retention, and admission of a diverse student population. This event also includes fundraising for the McTeer Scholarship that is exclusively focused on the recruitment of highly qualified URM candidates. Alumni and URM candidates for dental schoolAllows dental school leadership the opportunity to discuss and explore recruitment strategies and needs with alumni currently serving throughout the state of SCEvent surveys indicate a significant change in perceptions pertaining to diversity at the JBECDM. Referrals of perspective candidates have also increased and the McTeer Scholarship fund is now endowed. Funding from this endowment is used to support URM recruitment.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental MedicineParticipation in the Earnest E. Just Scientific Symposium allows the JBECDM Office of Diversity to identify potential candidates from diverse backgrounds for pre-doctoral and DMSTP admissions.URM and other candidatesPromote dentistry as a career option and answer questions regarding the admission processSuccess is measured through increased numbers of URM admissions and applicants as well as increases in program inquiries from URM candidates.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine -
Student Mentors for Minorities in Medicine (SM3)
Preparing students for a future career in medicine; monthly large-group sessions and one-on-one sessions with current medical studentsURM high school and college studentsTo provide a mentoring process (academic and professional) for high school URM students, thereby building comradery and support for URM students at MUSCApproximately 40 students participate each year
Retention and completion
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCEducation and Student Life Summer Youth Employee ProgramFunding 10-12 full-time, temporary positions for six weeksHigh school and college underrepresented minority studentsTo increase pipeline for underrepresented minority students at MUSCProgram has been in existence over 20 years.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Graduate Studies Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP)Students participate in a 15-hour course that appears on an MUSC transcriptUndergraduate students (50% are underrepresented minority students) participate in a course to learn about research and future careers in health sciencesTo address the pipeline for underrepresented students in sciencesApproximately 75-80 students participate each year. Students must complete research plan, 5-10 page final paper, abstract and presentation.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Graduate Studies Recruitment Effort Conferences and SocietiesOffering, participating in, and leading several conferences and workshops for the purpose of MUSC minority recruitmentURM undergraduate, graduate, and professionalsTo recruit minority students to attain advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in scienceOver 4,400 undergraduate and graduate students attend these conferences annually. Applicants are asked how heard of program on MUSC application.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCTeen Health Leadership Program (THLP) Collaboration between MUSC Library, MUSC College of Nursing, and Communities in Schools. The program is funded by the National Library of Medicine and Center for Public Service Communications.The aims of the program are to increase health information among students, develop leadership skills in students, facilitate their engagement in their community, and to promote health careers among minority students. The program is currently in its eighth year.St. John’s High School students in tenth, eleventh, and twelfth gradesTo increase health information among rural high school students, develop leadership skills in students, facilitate their engagement in their community, and to promote health careers among minority students 94% of our students attend college after graduation.
47% of our students were the first in their families to attend college.
30% of our students choose a major in a health related field. Our program is currently completing a four-year review to look at college success, plans for graduate school, and entry into a health career.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Health Professions and AHEC (Area Health Education Consortium)• Summer Careers Academy--
support 6-7students per year
• Polycom Presentations
• Bench2Bedside Summit
AHEC High school group visits to CHP.
URM high school and college students from across the state of SC and NC Southern RegionAHEC is designed to increase the number of young people who aspire to become healthcare professionals, emphasizing underrepresented ethnic minority groups and the economically disadvantaged.Through AHEC, the College of Health Professions reaches approximately 150 URM high school and college students each year.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCSC AHEC Bench to BedsideProviding networking opportunities, curricular guidance, and skill development to enhance the participants’ abilities to compete academicallyUndergraduate students from several colleges in the state who have an interest in becoming a health care professionalTo increase the number of applications submitted by underrepresented, rural, and minority (URM) students to health care professions training programs in SC and to increase the acceptance of these students into these training programs by helping them to create strong applicationsAn average of 148 students participate annually.

Of 71 trackable undergraduate students in the Bench to Bedside program, we were able to match 66 students using NSC Student Tracker. Of these 66, 20 have graduated: 13 majored in biology or biological sciences, 4 in health sciences, 1 received an undergraduate degree as a physical therapy assistant, and 1 with an unknown major.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine (JBECDM)The Post baccalaureate Reapplication Education Program (PREP) supports students who need additional coursework and related preparations to matriculate into JBECDMCandidates with admissions potential who presently lack one (or more) component of academic credentialsThe program was designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority (URM) applicants who could successfully matriculate into the JBECDM.Ten students have successfully completed the PREP program and entered the JBECDM with a 100% retention and graduation rate to date. Of these PREP participants, four have earned their DMD and are licensed and practicing dentists. The remaining six students are presently enrolled.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCSC AHEC Summer Careers AcademyProviding a one-week program annually on the MUSC campus including didactic sessions that focus on several health disparities prevalent to SCHigh school graduates and college studentsTo increase the acceptance, retention, and graduation rates of URM and disadvantaged students to health care training programs in SCAn average of 27 students participates annually.

The students selected for the Summer Careers Academy (SCA) were required to have gained acceptance to a college prior to entering the one-week residential program. Available data from NSC Student Tracker indicate that thus far, 75% of the SCA students (71 of 95) who entered college between 2005 and 2009 have graduated, 86% with a health major.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine (COM) Underrepresented in Medicine (URM) Visiting Student ProgramProvides support for URM students’ participation in a variety of rotations throughout MUSCTo recruit talented 4th year URM medical students from other schools to MUSC who have met all of the requirements for visiting student electives listed in VASASuccess measures:
# of participating departments

# of students accepted as a resident

11 COM Departments at MUSC participate each year.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental MedicineOur annual Dental Day event brings pre-health professional advisors and interested students from various colleges and universities, including Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) to the MUSC campus and JEBCDM. We introduce them to dentistry and the dental curriculum, the recruitment and admission processes and procedures. CDM’s commitment to admission and matriculation of diverse student population is also emphasized.Candidates and Pre-health AdvisorsIntroduce potential candidates from underrepresented populations and pre-health academic advisors to dental careers while sharing information on the admissions application process including, the required academic credentials and interview processIn 2014, 200 participants including pre-health advisors, candidates, and parents participated in Dental Day. Program surveys indicate that the event improved communication and supported the goal of increased program and admissions knowledge.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental MedicineThe SC Area Health Education Consortium (AHEC) Pre-Dental Academy, with the College of Nursing and the College of Medicine, introduces under-represented populations of college students to the CDM and the profession of dental medicine. Presentations include organizational strategies, science, math, and introduction to dentistry, as well as the admissions process/procedures. This academy also allows the student to experience inter-professional interactions with other disciplines (nursing and medicine).Undergraduate college students from underrepresented groupsIntroduce potential candidates from underrepresented populations to dental careers while sharing information on the application and entrance process.Success is measured through increased numbers of URM admissions and applicants as well as increases in program inquiries from URM candidates.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCJames B. Edwards College of Dental MedicinePresentations and career fairs made via an agreement and commitment with the Charleston County School District exposes elementary, middle, and high school students at inner city schools to dental careers. Sessions are also presented annually at all HBCUs in South Carolina.URM CandidatesIntroduce dentistry as a career option and answer questions regarding the admission process.Success is measured through increased numbers of URM admissions and applicants as well as increases in program inquiries from URM candidates.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Graduate Studies Ernest Just SymposiumProviding campus tours and meeting in breakout sessions with representatives of their colleges of interestURM undergraduate students and their advisors from throughout the state and regionSymposium to hear nationally known researchers speak and expose students to scienceOver 400 undergraduate and high school students participate each year. Review number of attendees that apply to MUSC.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCHP Participation in Ernest E. Just SymposiumThe Ernest E. Just Symposium is hosted each February by the College of Graduate Studies. It is geared towards URM students interested in pursuing a program in health professions. The afternoon session divides the visiting students up into which College or program they would like to learn more about.Over 250 visiting high school and college students from the southeast.
Schools include: Spelman College, Morehouse University, Claflin University, Clark Atlanta University, Fayetteville State University, USC-Aiken, Benedict College, Anderson University, Airport High School, and Westwood High School
To expose hundreds of students from across the southeast to what MUSC has to offer in each collegeCHP had more than 35 students visit the College in the afternoon session to listen to current students discuss admissions and curriculum and answer the visiting students’ questions.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine -
Glimpse in Medicine
Providing a campus visit and participation on forums with medical studentsLocal high school students and undergraduate studentsTo provide information concerning medical school as well as careers in medicineApproximately 350 students are served annually.

Success measures:
# of middle school, high school and undergraduate students that attended on-site visit

# of high school students who matriculated into college

# of undergraduates who matriculated into medical school or health professional program
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine -
A Day in the Life of a Medical Student
Pairing with current medical studentsUndergraduate studentsTo pair undergraduate students with medical students for a day in order to engage in all activities with their hosting medical studentsApproximately five students participate annually.

Success measures:
# of undergraduate students who attended classes with medical students

# of undergraduate students who went into health professions/medical schools
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCSC AHEC Careers Academy and College of Nursing

See SC AHEC section of the report
Increase students' knowledge of nursing, exposure to nursing culture, admission requirements, and academic success skills8 rising freshmen-junior underrepresented minority and disadvantaged college studentsTo help underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students prepare for entry into nursing, dental medicine, medicine, pharmacy, physicians assistant, and occupational therapy training programs Successful completion of the program

Successful application and entry into program of nursing in SC
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine Post-Baccalaureate Reapplication Education Program (PREP)Providing admission into the College of MedicinePromising URM, rural, and disadvantaged students in post-baccalaureate coursesTo prepare the students for medical school2-3 students annually

Success measures:
# completed the PREP program

# matriculated into MUSC

# graduated from MUSC

54 students have completed PREP and matriculated into the College of Medicine.

11 students currently enrolled in the College of Medicine.

39 students graduated from the College of Medicine.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsMUSCCollege of Medicine (COM) Second Look Program as a Medical StudentPair URM applicants who received acceptance with current URM medical studentsPotential URM medical studentsTo pair potential URM medical students who were offered a slot at MUSC for a second look and engage in all activities with their hosting medical studentsTo be implemented in 2015-2016

Success measures:
# of students who attend Second Look

# of students who matriculate to COM
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsTrident Technical CollegeEducational Opportunity Center (TRIO program)The Educational Opportunity Centers program provides counseling and information on college admissions to qualified adults who want to enter or continue a program of postsecondary education. The program also provides services to improve the financial and economic literacy of participants. An important objective of the program is to counsel participants on financial aid options, including basic financial planning skills, and to assist in the application process.The Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) program provides counseling and information on college admissions to qualified adults 19 years old and older who want to enter, re-enter or transfer to postsecondary education programs. The goal of EOC is to increase the number of adult participants who enroll in postsecondary education institutionsSuccess is measured by a set of objectives mandated by the U.S. Department of Education and the Annual Performance Report (APR) submitted to the Department of Education at the end of each grant year.
Recruiting Diverse and Underrepresented PopulationsUSCUndergraduate Admissions/Student Success Center – Gamecock Gateway
Mary Wagner, Director of Undergraduate Admissions
Eric Moschella, Director of the Student Success Center
Collaborative Residential Bridge Program between the University of South Carolina and Midlands Technical College.
Students live on USC’s campus and are able to participate in campus life while completing 30 transferable credit hours and achieving a 2.25 GPA in their coursework at Midlands Technical College.
Students enrolled in Gamecock Gateway program
Applies to predominantly South Carolina residents
Serves as an access point to a USC degree
Completion of the program (1 year)
Matriculation to USC after program completion
Completion of USC degree within 4 and 6 years from time the student entered the program
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsThe CitadelCitadel Success InstituteThe Citadel Success Institute (CSI) is a summer program where students take academic coursework and engage in a preparatory program designed to ease the transition from high school to college.The program was designed for low income and first-generation students and has been expanded to all studentsIncrease retention and student successRetention rates
Graduation rates
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsClemsonUndergraduate Studies- FIRST Program
(Sherry Dorris, Coordinator)
• Proactive mentoring provided by qualified student mentors matched primarily by major
• Living Learning Community with first-generation staff and mentors living in the community, study halls and regular academic counseling
• Summer Preview program for 40 first-generation students, who complete a 3-credit academic course and experience living on campus
• Workshops specific to first-generation student issues
• Academic counseling provided to all students by staff and graduate students
• Collaboration with other programs for professional mentor training and services for special populations (such as Connections, and Transfer Student Services)
• Academic review sessions offered for large freshman courses
First-generation students in all majors (comprise approximately 15% of the new freshman and transfer student population)• Positively impact student success indicators (persistence, scholarship retention, and graduation rates)
• Increased first-generation student feeling of connection and belonging on Clemson's campus
• Increased knowledge of learning strategies and self-management behaviors
• Enrollment persistence rates
• Graduation rates
• Student engagement/participation rates
• Survey data regarding students' behaviors, attitudes, beliefs, and satisfaction as students
• Post-graduation
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsClemsonAcademic Affairs and Student Affairs - Programs for the Betterment of Students (PBS) (Ad hoc task force)
(Sue Whorton)
SOAR Institute (Pilot program)-Deliver weekly seminars related to academic and career success as well as campus resources.Low-income first-generation students from South Carolina• Develop a program to positively impact the retention and graduation rates of low-income first-generation students• Retention rates
• Academic performance
• Level of academic self-efficacy
• Level of sense of belongingness
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsClemsonOffice of Access and Equity - Emerging Scholars
(Amber Lange, Director)
• Provide high school students from under resourced schools the information and motivation to go to college through programming during the academic year and summer months• High school students from Allendale, Bamberg and Hampton counties.
• Majority of participants are low- income, first generation students of color
• Provide motivation and information not offered to students currently
• Increase the high school graduation and college-going rate of students from the Corridor of Shame counties
• Create a college going culture in their communities and families
• High school graduation rate (100%)
• College going or military entrance rate (90%)
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsClemsonEugene T. Moore School of Education - Call Me Mister Program• An academic support system
• A cohort system for social and cultural support
• Assistance with job placement
• Tuition assistance through Loan Forgiveness programs for admitted students pursuing approved programs of study in teacher education at participating colleges
• Students from among underserved, socioeconomically disadvantaged and educationally at-risk communities.• Increase the pool of diverse teachers, particularly among South Carolina's lowest-performing elementary schools.• Retention rates
• Graduation rates
• Number of teachers placed in SC schools
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsCollege of CharlestonROAR Scholars ProgramProviding academic and social support for first generation students, students from low-income backgrounds, and/or students with disabilities through advising, career, financial and personal counseling as well as workshops and programming to provide them with tools to succeed in college. In addition, limited aid to fill in the margins is available to those in need to make it possible for low-income students to buy books and pay for campus housing.Low income/first generation students and a few with disabilitiesTo provide first generation/low income students and students with disabilities specialized support to help them graduate from collegeThe persistence rate and academic standing of these students is tracked from year to year.
Surveys of ROAR participants regarding programming are conducted. Student contact hours are tracked and participation in programming is tracked.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsTrident Technical CollegeDirector of Education Talent Search (TRIO) ProgramETS program identifies and assists individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds that have the potential to complete post-secondary educationLow income and first-generation youths and adults between 11 and 27 years of ageTarget the underserved students in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties (low income and first generation students or Free or reduced lunch)College acceptance and enrollment
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsTrident Technical CollegeMentoringCall Me MisterMale students from underserved, disadvantaged communities who are committed to a teaching career in SC K-12To increase the pool of teachers from a broader, more diverse background.Completion of courses and testing necessary to transfer to a 4-year college's teacher education program
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsTrident Technical CollegeScholars Network (TRIO Student Support Services Program)Provide opportunities for academic development, assist students with basic college requirements, and to motivate students toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education. The goal of Scholars Network is to increase the college retention and graduation rates of its participants.Accepted and/or enrolled low-income, first-generation students with an academic need (those taking developmental courses or pre-requisite courses), students who have been out of college for five or more years or students who have a documented disability.Per information provided by Institutional Research on college's academic need for a major group of students enrolled at TTC. The grant proposal objectives are designed to retain and graduate students within a four-year period of timeAnticipated outcomes include four objectives. Objective A: Persistence Rate: 68% of all participants served in the reporting year will persist from one academic year to the beginning of the next academic year or earn an associate's degree or certificate and/or transfer from a 2-year to a 4-year institution by the fall term of the next academic year. Objective B: Good Academic Standing Rate: 67% of all enrolled participants served will meet the performance level required to stay in good academic standing. Objective C. 1: Graduation Rate: 10% of new participants served each year will graduate from the grantee institution with an associate's degree or certificate within four (4) years. Objective C. 2: Transfer Rate: 6% of new participants served each year will receive an associate's degree or certificate from the grantee institution and transfer to a four-year institution within four (4) years.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCTrio ProgramsTrio often serves as sort of a funnel for 1ST generation and underrepresented populations to our services. For example we provide SI support for special sections of Math for some of their programs, and our Financial Literacy program is engaged with their students via some required consultations with our staff. Additionally the SSC develops comprehensive academic support for the general population, and will at time target certain sub-populations in partnership with others on campus. For example this semester we have partnered with Financial Aid to reach out and provide support to Pell students. We will be working to help them manage finances for college and develop academic/study skills.1st generation and underrepresented populationsWe will be working to help manage finances for college and develop academic/study skills.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCUndergraduate Admissions - Mini Camp College (with support from Southern Association of College Admissions Counselors [SACAC])
Mary Wagner, Director
Introduce students to components of the college application process through case studies, panels, and interactive exercises.Area students participating in TRIO and Upward Bound Programs• Encourage low income and first-generation students to explore a nearby college campus.
• Expose students to area resources that support their educational attainment goals.
• Attendance counts by school and headcount.
• Number of student attendees who apply to USC later.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCUndergraduate Admissions - Intensive Admissions Advising
Mary Wagner, Director
• Provide ongoing counseling support for students who are less familiar with the college search and application process.
• Service provided via several channels including electronic, print, telecounseling, and in person support.
Low income, 1st generation.• Broaden awareness of college application process and major selection
Assist families with steps associated with applying to college.
Annual report identifying number of students targeted, number applied, accepted, and enrolled.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCUndergraduate Admissions - Coalition Application participant (Inaugural member)
Mary Wagner, Director
• Inaugural participant in the Coalition for Access, Affordability and Success (AKA Coalition Application).
• USC is one of 90+ institutions, with a commitment to serving 1st generation students with generous aid and a history of strong graduation rates, participating in this new college application tool which makes college planning tools easier to understand and more accessible to students from underserved backgrounds.
Low income, 1st generation applicants• Streamline college search and application process.
• Introduce students to institutions with a proven track record of student success as measured by graduation rates and a strong institutional commitment to providing financial aid for low income students.
• Fall 2017 application cycle will USC's first on this new platform.
• Will track number of applications submitted via Coalition, acceptance and enrolled rates.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCUndergraduate Admissions - College Application Days
Mary Wagner, Director
Participate in state-wide College Application Days (organized by SC Commission on Higher Education)Low income students from high schools with high proportion of students on free/reduced lunch.• Assist students with completing applications to SC institutions of higher education.
• Encourage underserved students to submit at least one application to the college of their choosing.
Annual report from CHE estimating numbers of students served by these events.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCUndergraduate Admissions - Low Income application fee waiver programUndergraduate admissions grants application fee waivers to students who qualify for SAT, ACT, or NACAC fee waiver. Eligibility is dependent on family income.Low income students who qualify for waiver programs.To encourage students of all income levels to apply to USCAnnual report of number of fee waivers granted.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCUndergraduate Admissions - Gates Millennium Scholars Program Workshops
Mary Wagner, Director
• Invite eligible area students to workshops describing the application process for the Gates Millennium Scholars Program.
Co-lead workshops with representatives from Gates Foundation.
Low income, 1st generation students of color.• Encourage students to apply for aid programs for which they may qualify.
• Introduce students to a college campus in their community.
Annual report of number of GMS students enrolled.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCOffice of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships and Opportunity Scholarship Program - Gamecock Guarantee
Joey Derrick, Director
Providing academic and financial support to first generation South Carolina students demonstrating family income of less than 150% of the published poverty guidelines. This is a joint effort between the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships and the Opportunity Scholars Program. Tuition and fees are covered by the program, with the goal of reducing student loan debt while providing intensive academic support for success.Low income, first generation college students.This program provides a pathway for the neediest students to earn a college degree from USC without incurring heavy debt.Enrollment, Retention, Graduation Rates, Average Debt and Graduation, Percentage of Award as Gift Aid
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCOffice of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships - USC Access Grant
Joey Derrick, Director
Providing institutional need-based funds to lower-middle income South Carolina students who do not qualify for a Federal Pell Grant but demonstrate significant financial need.Lower-middle income South Carolina students who do not qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.Students from lower-middle income students are often heavily reliant on student loan assistance to achieve a college degree and are therefore dissuaded by the prospect of disproportional debt.Degree attainment by this population.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCOffice of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships - Managing Educational Debt Successfully (MEDS)
Joey Derrick, Director
Providing targeted guidance to low income student loan borrowers, to help them understand the terms of their student loans and successfully repay them.Federal Pell Grant recipients who are receiving student loan assistanceTo ensure that this population can be successful at managing student loan debt.Number of students reached, default rate
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCThe Opportunity Scholars Program (OSP)
Paul Beasley, Director
The OSP is structured around a set of high-impact practices designed to support student engagement in campus activities associated with success. It includes a combination of guidance and advocacy services that mitigate adjustment concerns. Primary components include OSP-specific general education courses in the first year, a residential learning community, partnerships with key campus offices to provide support and beyond-the-classroom opportunities, and mentoring by OSP upperclassmen.Participants in the Opportunity Scholars Program are entering freshmen (regular admits) who are South Carolina residents, Pell Grant recipients, and potential first-generation college graduates.Improve student success and graduation rates for first generation Pell grant recipients.• Freshmen to sophomore year retention rates (at least 90%).
• Percent of participants completing at least 15 hours each semester.
• Cohort retention rates,
• Four-year graduation rates.
• Overall graduation rates.
Lower Income and 1st Generation StudentsUSCOpportunity Scholars ProgramLow income, first generation students take freshman year courses as a cohort. Low income, first generation students.The program encourages student success by creating a"small college” atmosphere that includes tutoring assistance, academic advising, guidance on undergraduate research and study abroad opportunities, mentoring, workshops and cultural enrichment opportunities. 50% minority students (30% Black)
72% five-year graduation rate (2008 cohort)
95% freshman to sophomore retention rate for the past five years

Claflin University

Claflin University is a comprehensive institution of higher education affiliated with the United Methodist Church. A historically black university founded in 1869, Claflin is committed to providing students with access to exemplary educational opportunities in its undergraduate, graduate and continuing education programs. Claflin seeks to foster a rich community comprised of students, faculty, staff and administrators who work to nurture and develop the skills and character needed for engaged citizenship and visionary and effective leadership.

Claflin University opened its doors for the first time in 1869, which makes it the oldest HBCU in South Carolina. It is a “national” liberal arts institution of 1925 students with incoming freshmen coming from 19 states and 7 foreign nations with an average GPA of 3.18 (w).  Approximately 1100 live in 11 residence halls that are attractive “living-learning” spaces with all amenities including wireless access to the internet and internet2. The total cost to attend Claflin is $24,314 to $26,434 depending on dorm choice, one of the best values among colleges in the South. To ease the financial burden, 89% of students are awarded financial aid. 77% of incoming freshmen return for the sophomore year, 49%, and 100% of education majors pass the PRAXIS licensure exam. These rates compare very favorably with the rates of the independent college and universities in the South Carolina.

At Claflin, there is 1 professor for every 13 students with about 80% of the 122 fulltime instructors holding the terminal degree. Over the last two decades, they have won numerous awards with 4 being recognized as the Governor’s Professor of the Year. It is thus no wonder that the institution has been recognized as one of the top 25 colleges by Washington Monthly, listed in the top 15% of the nation’s institutions of higher education by Forbes.com** and ranked in the top 10 among HBCUs by U.S. News and World Report.

At Claflin, a student can choose from around 700 courses in 36 majors and 3 graduate programs 3 of which are on-line. They can peruse 171,813 books or access 301,483 eBooks in the H.V. Manning Library a day or from one of the 26 academic labs and receive instruction in one of the classrooms which are all SMART spaces. There is 1 computer available for every 3 students. As a result, Claflin students are more satisfied with their overall experience than their peers at National 4-year private colleges in 11 out of 12 categories, according to the latest SSI data (Student Satisfaction Inventory).

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